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Showing posts with label Speaking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Speaking. Show all posts

August 10, 2022

Showing Strong Feelings: Love, Sadness, Sympathy, Condolence, Embarrassment, and Anger

A. Asking about Feelings / Thoughts
Showing Strong Feelings
  • How do you feel about it?
  • What do you have in mind?
  • What are you thinking about?
  • Do you have something on your mind?
  • What are you looking so serious about?
  • Is something bothering you?
  • Are you worried about something?
B. Expressing wonder / curiosity
  • I wonder what it really is.
  • I was just wondering how to do it.
  • I wonder why he could do such thing to her
  • I wonder if she likes studying here.
  • I wonder at her directness.
C. Expressing Love
  • I love you.
  • I really love you and I always will.
  • I truly love you endlessly.
  • I’ll never stop loving you.
  • My love will never cease till the end of time.
  • There’s nothing that compares with my love for you.
  • Words can never describe my love for you.
  • Words fail to convey how much I love you.
D. Expressing Sadness
  • I’m so sad I don’t know what to do.
  • Please leave me alone.
  • I’m very sad to see / hear that.
  • My heart is so burdened.
  • I can’t describe my pain and sorrow.
  • It has brought me a lot of misery.
  • I regret having to do this.
E. Being Sympathetic to Less Serious News
  • Oh no! What a pity!
  • What a shame!
  • What a nuisance!
  • Poor you.
  • How awful!
  • How annoying!
  • That’s life!
  • Too bad!
  • I hope it’s nothing serious.
F. Being Sympathetic to Very Sad News
  • How awful!
  • How terrible!
  • I’m really sorry to hear that.
  • That must’ve been awful!
G. Expressing Condolence
  • We are thinking about you at this difficult time.
  • My condolences in your bereavement.
  • Please accept my heartfelt sympathies.
  • I’d like to express my deepest condolences.
  • I am so sorry for your loss.
  • You have my deepest sympathy.
  • I am so sorry that ..(a person).. has passed away. May your memories comfort you.
  • May God comfort you.
  • We are praying for you at this difficult time.
H. Cheering someone up
  • I can see why you’re so sad ..., but ....
  • Take it easy.
  • Calm down.
  • I don’t think it’s a big deal.
  • Oh, you poor thing!
  • Sorry about that.
I. Expressing Embarrassment
  • It made me ashamed.
  • I was very embarrassed / ashamed.
  • How embarrassing / shameful!
  • Tell me it never happened.
  • What a shame!
  • Shame on me!
Response
  • I don’t think it’s a big deal.
  • That’s all right.
  • Forget it.
  • Come on! It can’t be as bad as all that.
J. Expressing Anger
  • I’ve never been so insulted in my life.
  • I can’t take this anymore!
  • This is extremely irritating!
  • I’m very unhappy / displeased with ....
  • What do you mean?
  • You’ve made me angry.
  • Why on earth did you do that?
  • Are you trying to tell me that ...?
K. Calming someone down
  • Calm down. I didn’t mean it.
  • Relax. Take it easy.
  • Don’t be so touchy.
  • Don’t be angry with me.
  • Temper, temper.
  • Don’t let it bother you.
EXERCISE

August 05, 2022

Giving And Asking For Permission, And Making And Responding To Preventions In English

Asking For Permission
W
riting this material reminds me of one of the most amusing experiences that I have had during my long years of being an English teacher. That day, I was teaching a class when a boy student got up from his chair and walked to me. Then he spoke to me in Indonesian, asking for permission to go to the bathroom. I rejected and asked him to use English. Responding to my requirement, he said, "Sir, I am toilet." And the class burst out laughing.

Do you know why? Yes, the sentence "Sir, I am toilet." is NOT the correct expression to say when you are requesting or asking for permission to leave the classroom and go to the bathroom. Now, in order for us not to make a similar mistake when we are requesting permission, let's study the following expressions.

A. Using Modals: "Can I", "Could I", "May I":
Using "Can I", "Could I", "May I"Verb 1
Can I
Could I
May I
go to the bathroom?
use your car?
close the door?
Giving permissionRefusing to give permission
Yes, you can.
Sure, please do.
Certainly, go ahead.
Yes, of course
No problem
By all means.
Yes, why not?
No, sorry.
I’m sorry, you can’t.
No, I’m afraid not ....
I'm afraid you can't do that.
You're now allowed to ....
You should not ....
B. Using "Would you mind ...?":
Using "Would you mind if ...?"subject + Verb 2 (Simple Past)?
Would you mind ifI went to the bathroom?
I used your car?
I closed the door?
Giving permissionRefusing to give permission
No, not at all.
Certainly not.
Please do.
No, go ahead.
I'm sorry, you can't.
Yes, I would.
Certainly.
C. Using "Do you mind ...?":
Using "Do you mind if ...?"subject + Verb 1 (Simple Present)?
Do you mind ifI open the window?
I leave now?
I close the door?
Giving permissionRefusing to give permission
No, I don't.
No, not at all.
Certainly not.
Please do.
No, go ahead.
I'm sorry, you can't.
Yes, I do.
Certainly.
Note: Be careful when responding to a request using "Would you mind ...?". The response "Yes, certainly" would indicate that "you would mind". Hence, if you have objection to the request and do not want to give permission, the response should be "Yes, certainly", "Yes, I do". If you have no objection, the appropriate response would be "No, I don't mind", or "No, please be my guest."
D. Using Other forms:
Using "wonder"subject + could + Verb 1 (Simple Past)?
I wonder ifI could borrow your dictionary.
I could use your car.
Giving permissionRefusing to give permission
Yes, certainly.
Please do.
Why not? Go ahead.
I'm sorry, you can't.
I'm sorry, but I'm still using it.
E. Making Preventions:
Making Preventions
I wouldn’t do that if I were you.
I wouldn’t take the risk if I were in your shoes. It’s too risky.
(I think) it’s not a good idea.
Responding to Preventions
Allright. I’ll consider that.
I’ll think about that.
I’ll think it over.
I’ll reschedule my plan.
Please do.
Why not? Go ahead.
F. Example Dialogues.
Short Dialogue 1
Man : Excuse me, could I try this shirt?
Woman : Yes, please. There's a fitting room over there, near the counter.
Short Dialogue 2
Man : Do you mind if I use your computer to type this letter?
Woman : No, not at all. Please do.
Short Dialogue 3
Woman : May I open the windows? It's very stuffy here.
Man : I'm afraid you can't. The wind is very strong outside.
Short Dialogue 4
Man : Can I put my luggage here?
Woman : That's okay, but please don't be too long.
G. EXERCISE
Write short dialogues like the above examples about permissions based on the following situations.
  1. Your camera is out of battery. You want to borrow your friend's camera.
  2. It's getting late. You should leave your friend's house and go home.
  3. It's very windy and dusty outside. You want to close the windows.
  4. You forgot to bring your charger. You need to use your friend's phone charger.
  5. You want to turn on your television.
  6. You want to go to a movie with your best friends.
  7. You want to visit your friend at the hospital this afternoon. You ask for permission to your mother.
  8. You cannot use your motorcycle to come to your friend's party. You ask your best friend to lend you his motorcycle.
  9. Your pen suddenly runs out. You want to use your deskmate's pen but he is still using it.
  10. You want to go to the beach, but your parents do not allow you to go because the weather is bad.
Prev: 51611 1201PM PV192

August 01, 2022

Talking About Jobs & Routine Tasks

Talking About Jobs
T
alking about jobs and professions or occupations is very common in social interactions, especially when we want to know more about a person that we have just met. Small talks on jobs or professions is one of the safest topic to talk about in initial meetings. You can build a light and comfortable conversations by talking or asking about jobs or professions, for example discussing the type of job you do and where you work.
Tips: In talking about jobs or routine tasks, we mainly use the simple present tense.

Here are some gambits and expressions that you can use in talking about jobs or professions.

A. Asking about jobs / professions.
  • Do you have a job?
  • Do you work full-time or part-time?
  • Where do you work?
  • What are you?
  • What is he?
  • What is your job?
  • What is his job?
  • What is your father's job?
  • What is your occupation?
  • What is your profession?
  • What do you do?
  • What type of job do you do?
  • What does he do?
  • What does your father do?
  • What does he do for a living?
  • How does he earn a living?
  • What do you do to make a living?
B. Telling about jobs / professions.
  • I am a student / a teacher / a bank clerk, etc.
  • He is a soldier / a teacher / a doctor, etc.
  • I work as a teacher in a vocational school.
  • He works as a consultant.
  • I work for a foreign company.
  • He works in a garment manufacturer and exporter.
  • My job is selling computers online.
  • Her job is handling telephone calls.
  • He is in charge of the front office department.
  • Her job mainly deals with customers' complaints.
C. Showing interest
  • Are you?
  • Wow! That must be interesting.
  • How interesting!
  • It must be a well-paid job.
  • That sounds like a lot of hard work.
  • That must be a lot of work.
  • That must be a rewarding job.
D. Example Dialogue
Read the following conversation and practice it.
Anne :Hi, Jim. I heard that you've got a new job now.
Jim :Yes. I resigned from my old job two months ago, and moved to an exporting company.
Anne :How do you travel to work now?
Jim :By city bus. I usually take the A17 bus at 6:45 every morning.
Anne :What time do you start work?
Jim :At 8 sharp.
Anne :And how do you spend the day in your new job?
Jim :Well, in the morning I usually type letters to customers.
Anne :What time is your lunch break?
Jim :We have a one-hour break from 12 pm until 1 pm.
Anne :And what do you do in the afternoon?
Jim :I usually make telephone calls, and check incoming emails.
Anne :Sounds interesting! What time do you finish work?
Jim :I usually leave the office at 4.30 pm.
Anne :I hope you like your new job, Jim. See you!
Jim :Thanks, Anne. See you!
E. EXERCISES
I. Guess what profession is being talked about.
II. Answer these questions by referring to the example dialogue between Anne and Jim above.
  1. Where does Jim work?
  2. How long has he been working there?
  3. How does he go to work?
  4. What time does he catch the bus to work?
  5. What time does he start work?
  6. What does he usually do in the morning?
  7. What time does he have lunch?
  8. What does he usually do after lunch?
  9. What time does he leave work?
  10. What can you infer about the relationship between the speakers?
III. Explain these occupations. Use the Simple Present to tell about the places of work and what he or she usually does.
Example:
A policeman : He usually works in the police station, but sometimes on the street. He controls the traffic and keeps situation in order.
  1. A bell boy : ....
  2. A receptionist : ....
  3. A teacher : ....
  4. A waitress : ....
  5. A farmer : ....
  6. A nurse : ....
  7. A firefighter : ....
  8. A front desk clerk : ....
  9. A carpenter : ....
  10. An architect : ....
  11. A shopkeeper : ....
  12. A tailor : ....
  13. A lawyer : ....
  14. A chef : ....
  15. A room boy : ....

May 23, 2022

There + be: 'There is' And 'There are'

livingroom
L
ook at the picture of a livingroom on the left. We can describe the existence of things in the room by using "there is" and/or "there are". The examples below talk about the existence or presence of things in the livingroom by using "there is" and "there are". Pay attention to them.
  • There is a window in the livingroom.
  • There is a sofa next to the window.
  • There is an orange carpet on the floor.
  • There is a standing lamp next to the sofa.
  • There is a wooden shelf beside the window.
  • There are some books and a photograph on the shelf.

A. Using "There is" and "There are"
I. Countable Nouns
Singular Nouns:
+: There is (There's) + singular noun
?: Is there + singular noun?
-: There is not (There isn't) + singular noun
Example sentences:
  • There is (There's) a big tree in the garden.
  • There is (There's) a book on that shelf.
  • There is (There's) a car in the garage.
  • There is (There's) the book you're looking for.
  • A: Is there a book in the bag?
    B: Yes, there is. / No, there isn't.
Plural Nouns
+: There are + plural noun
?: Are there + plural noun?
-: There are not (There aren't) + plural noun
Example sentences:
  • There are big trees in the garden.
  • There aren't many books on that shelf.
  • There are three cars in the garage.
  • There are the books you're looking for.
  • A: Are there many books on that shelf?
    B: Yes, there are. / No, there aren't.
  • A: How many students are there in your class?
    B: There are twenty.
II. Uncountable Nouns
+: There is (There's) + uncountable noun
?: Is there + uncountable noun?
-: There is not (There isn't) + uncountable noun
Example sentences:
  • There is (There's) some money in the drawer.
  • There is some tea on the table.
  • There is some ice in the fridge.
  • There is not (There isn't) any money in the wallet.
  • We can't go skiing. There is not (There isn't) any snow.
Note: "Some" is usually used with positive and interrogative sentences, while "any" is used with interrogative and negative sentences. To learn the difference between "some" and "any", read Some VS Any: What's The Difference?.
B. Example Dialogue
Practice the following dialogue. Pay attention to the italicized words.
In the kitchen
An estate agent is showing Mr. and Mrs. Harris the kitchen.
Estate Agent:There you are. A wonderful new kitchen.
Mr. Harris:It's very small.
Estate Agent:There's the cooker and there's the refrigerator.
Mrs. Harris:Where?
Estate Agent:Behind you. The refrigerator's behind you.
Mrs. Harris:I can't open it.
Mr. Harris:I can't put the table outside. Then you can open the refrigerator.
Mrs. Harris:What's that under the table? On the floor?
Estate Agent:It's a box.
Mrs. Harris:What's inside the box?
Estate Agent:There are spoons, knives, forks, ....
Mr. Harris:Plates ....
Mrs. Harris:And there are cups, too. Where will we put all these things?
Estate Agent:Put them in the cupboard. There's a cupboard behind the door.
C. EXERCISE
A. Write sentences with "There is" or "There are" using the provided nouns. Look at the example.
    Example:
  1. a cup - the table.
    Answer: There is a cup on the table.
  2. a book - the shelf.
  3. a lot of cars - the parking lot
  4. so many ants - on the table
  5. some tea - the table
  6. some ice - the fridge
  7. a computer - the room
  8. few good restaurants - my town
  9. some money - my pocket
  10. a big lamp - the center of the room
  11. two English dictionaries - our library
B. Complete these sentences with "there is / there isn't / is there / there are / there aren't / are there".
  1. The fridge is empty. ... any food in it.
  2. Surabaya is a big city. ... many good hotels there.
  3. ... more than 17,500 islands in Indonesian archipelago.
  4. I like shopping here. ... a wide variety of products to choose from.
  5. The park is not crowded. ... many visitors that day.
  6. I don't think we need to eat out. ... enough rice for dinner.
  7. ... a new building next to the parking lot. It is the school auditorium.
  8. ... an ATM near here? I need to draw some money.
  9. ... komodo dragons in the zoo?
  10. How many computers ... in the office?
C. Let's play a "Horse Race" game. Answer each question as quickly as possible. You may play it in full-screen mode if necessary.
051611 1147AM PV122

December 21, 2021

Asking And Giving Directions

A. How to Ask for Direction
  • Where is ..., please?
  • How do I get to ...?
  • Can you help me, please? I want to get to ....
  • Can you tell me where ... is?
  • I’m looking for ....
B. How to Give Direction
  • Go straight ahead. Take the lift / stairs.
  • Turn left / right at the traffic lights.
  • Walk straight.
  • It’s on your left / right.
  • It’s on the second floor.
  • It’s upstairs / downstairs.
  • Take the first right.
  • Take the first exit.
  • Take the ... bus and get off at ....
  • It's next to ....
  • It's opposite ....
C. Useful Expressions with Illustrations
Ask And Give Directions
D. Example Dialogues
Dialogue 1
Andy stops a passer-by to ask the way to the city museum.
Andy:Excuse me, could you tell me where the museum is?
Passer-by:The museum? It’s just over there, next to the park.
Andy:Ah yes, thanks very much.
Passer-by:You're welcome.
Dialogue 2
Ann needs to go to an ATM and asks a passer-by.
Ann:Excuse me. Could you tell me the way to the nearest ATM?
Passer-by:Well, go straight and turn left at the first junction. Go along the street and you will find a big supermarket. There are ATM booths in front of it.
Ann:And what’s the supermarket called?
Passer-by:Matahari. Shall I write it down for you?
Ann:No, I think I’ve got it. Thanks a lot.
Passer-by:Bye!
Dialogue 3
Lidya wants to go to the art gallery but she doesn't know how to get there.
Lidya:Excuse me. How could I get to the art gallery?
Passer-by:The art gallery? Get the 11 bus from the corner here, and get off at the Central park. Then turn left into Bright Avenue, and go on until you get to the gallery. It's on your right.
Lidya:Could you write it down for me? I might get lost again otherwise.
Passer-by:Certainly ... [writes it down for Lidya] ... there you are.
Lidya:Thank you for your help.
Passer-by:My pleasure. Enjoy the art gallery!
Lidya:I will. Bye!
Passer-by:Bye!
E. Exercises

December 09, 2021

How To Express Amazement, Admiration, or Surprise in English

A. TELLING SURPRISING NEWS
  • Guess what!
  • Surprise!
  • I’ve got news for you!
  • Do you know what!
  • Are you sitting down?
  • You’d better sit down!
  • You won’t believe this, but...
B. EXPRESSING AMAZEMENT / ADMIRATION

That’s + adjective!

That’s
amazing!
incredible!
terrific!

That’s + noun phrase!

That’s
a beautiful goal!
a brilliant maneuver!
a nice dress!

What + noun phrase!

What
a wonderful voice she has!
a brilliant maneuver!
a nice dress!

How + adjective / adverb!

How
stunning she looks!
gently she walks!
clever!
C. EXPRESSING SURPRISE
Amazement, Admiration, Surprise
  • I’m really surprised at ....
  • Oh no! It can’t be (true)!
  • My goodness!
  • What a surprise!
  • What on earth is that thing?
  • I was shocked by ....
  • It’s too good to be true!
  • It’s unbelievable!
  • I can’t believe it!
  • Incredible!
  • It’s really beyond belief!
D. EXERCISES
I. Match each incomplete sentence into the correct word, "How" or "What".
II. Arrange these jumbled sentences
  1. experience – what – had – unforgettable – an – we
  2. was – fascinating – sunset – how – the
  3. actress – a – beautiful – what – is – she
  4. a – family – our – dinner – had – what – fantastic
  5. the – next – how – girl – is – adorable – door
  6. succeed – she – how – to – hard – tried
  7. perfect – by – what – Ronaldo – ball – a – long
  8. the – astonishing – was – sight – how
  9. hall – a – conference – large – what – is – it
  10. for – what – the – team – a – new – year – successful
III. Complete the following dialogues using your own words.
Dialogue 1
Didy:Look. Messy has just scored another goal.
Danny:Wow! ....
Didy:....
Dialogue 2
Bob:What are you reading?
Paul:Sport news as usual.
Bob:What's new today?
Paul:My favorite team won once again. So far, it is the only club that has won each of its five three league matches.
Bob:Really? ....
Paul:Furthermore, so far it has scored 11 goals and allowed none. Isn’t it amazing?
Bob:Indeed. ....
Dialogue 3
Yoyo:Can we go to the movie this evening?
Nike:I’d love to, but I’m sorry I’m tied up till 8 p.m. I’m going to have a meeting at 4 p.m. and it may last until 6. Then I still have to finish a report tonight in order to meet the deadline.
Yoyo:....
Nike:I wish I could go with you. What about Friday evening?
Yoyo:....

October 11, 2021

Making And Handling Telephone Calls

A. Useful Expressions
Receiving a call
  • Hello / good morning / good afternoon.
  • Good morning, ...(your institution)....
  • Hello. Dea speaking.
  • Yes, can I help you?
  • Oh, hi! It's been a long time. How are you?
Starting a call (caller)
  • Hello / good morning / good afternoon.
  • May I speak to ...(someone)..., please?
  • Could I speak to ...(someone)..., please?
  • I'd like to speak to ...(someone)....
Telling identity
  • This is ...(your name)... speaking.
  • ...(your name)... speaking.
  • I'm calling on behalf of ...(company)....
  • ...(someone)... told me to contact you.
Asking identity
  • Who's calling, please?
  • Who's speaking?
  • May I have your name?
  • Who am I speaking to?
  • Is that ...(someone)...?
  • Can I ask who’s calling?
Note:
We don’t use "Are you ...?"to find out who is on the other end of the phone.
We can ask "Is that Anne?", not "Are you Anne?"

Asking to wait
  • Hold the line, please.
  • Could you hold on?
  • Just a moment, please.
  • Please wait a minute.
Connecting
  • The line is free now. I'll put you through.
  • Thank you for holding.
Giving information
  • I'm sorry. He/she is not available at the moment.
  • I'm afraid the line is engaged. Could you call back later?
  • I'm afraid he's still in a meeting.
  • I'm sorry. He's out of the office today.
  • I'm sorry. There's nobody here by that name.
  • Sorry. I think you have dialled the wrong number.
Leaving a message
  • I'd like to leave a message.
  • Please tell him that I will meet him next week.
  • Please tell him that I called.
  • That's alright. I'll call back later.
  • Yes. Please tell him to contact me.
Taking a message
  • Would you like to leave a message?
  • Do you have a message?
  • May I take a message?
  • May I have your number?
  • Let me repeat your message. ...(repeat the message and confirm the details, e.g. place, time, telephone number, etc.)
Asking to repeat
  • I'm sorry. Could you speak up, please?
  • Could you repeat that, please?
  • I'm afraid I can't hear you.
  • I'm sorry. I didn't catch that. Come again?
  • I beg your pardon. The line is very bad.
Closing a call
  • Thank you. Bye.
B. Example Dialogues
Dialogue 1
Dave phones Vicki’s number to see if Nigel’s there.
DAVE: Hello, could I speak to Vicki?
VICKI: Speaking.
DAVE: Oh, hello Vicki – I didn’t recognise your voice. It’s Dave.
VICKI: Hi, Dave. How’s things?
DAVE: Not bad, thanks. Listen, I don’t suppose Nigel’s there, is he?
VICKI: No – but I’m expecting him round later on.
DAVE: OK – could you get him to ring me back?
VICKI: Of course. Can you give me your number?
DAVE: I think he’s got it, but let me give you it now just in case.
VICKI: Hang on – let me get a pen . . . OK.
DAVE: Six-seven-nine-oh-four-oh-four. Got that?
VICKI: Got it!

Dialogue 2
Handling Telephone Calls
Julie’s phone rings, and she answers.
JULIE: 247649.
TERRY: Ah, hello. Could I speak to Jim, please?
JULIE: Jim?
TERRY: Yes, Jim Fife. Is he there?
JULIE: I’m afraid there isn’t anyone here by that name. Who am I speaking to?
TERRY: This is Terry Smith. Isn’t that Marilyn’s house?
JULIE: No – you’ve got the wrong number.
TERRY: Ah – I’m sorry.
JULIE: Quite all right.

Dialogue 3
Cynthia phones to speak to Bob at work. But she gets through to his secretary.
CYNTHIA: Hello, it’s Cynthia Palmer here. Can I speak to Bob Watford please?
SECRETARY: Hold on, I’ll see if he’s available .... Hello? I’m afraid Mr Watford’s in a meeting at the moment. Would you like to leave a message?
CYNTHIA: Yes – could you ask him to get back to me as soon as possible?
SECRETARY: Yes – has he got your number?
CYNTHIA: Yes, he has.
SECRETARY: Fine – I’ll make sure he calls you as soon as he gets out of the meeting.
CYNTHIA: Thanks.

Source: Colloquial English: A Course for Non-Native Speakers by Gareth King